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Thai Chicken Fried Hat Yai Style, 'Gai Tod Hatyai'

Thai Chicken Fried Hat Yai Style, 'Gai Tod Hatyai'

When chicken is fried this way, it comes out dry rather than greasy. The secret is to cook the chicken two times--first at low heat, then again at high heat. This kind of fried chicken is so tasty when served with sweet chilli sauce. The coating is fragrant and delicious, and it's called 'Hat Yai' which is a province in Southern Thailand. If you like fried chicken, give this Thai-style version a try.

Ingredients

For 4 Person(s)

Ingredients

Buy ingredients for this Recipe

Method for Thai Chicken Fried Hat Yai Style, 'Gai Tod Hatyai'

In a mortar & pestle, pound peeled garlic. Add coriander seed and pound the mixture into a smooth paste. Add Thai pepper powder, and pound together in the mortar.

Separately, in a large mixing bowl, stab your chicken wings with a fork. Transfer the spice paste to the bowl of chicken. Add fish sauce and sugar, and knead it all together well with your hands. Place this in a ziploc bag for best results. Marinade it in the fridge for at leaste 2 hours, more if you prefer.

Remove from fridge and place in a large bowl. Sprinkle rice flour all over the wings. Mix well to coat the wings.

In a saucepot, heat several cups of vegetable oil to medium/low. If the oil is too hot, the skin of your wings will brown too early. It may take some practice. Add a few wings to the oil and fry at low heat for 12-15 minutes. The wings should be golden brown. Remove the wings and set aside to drain, and cool a bit.

Next, increase the heat of your oil to high. Fry each piece again, just 2-3 minutes. The wings will turn a darker brown and nice and crispy. Remove from oil, serve with a generous side of sweet chilli sauce, and Enjoy!

Chicken fried hat yai style gai tod hatyai

Chicken fried hat yai style gai tod hatyai

Spices for the marinade

Spices for the marinade

Pound into a paste

Pound into a paste

Marinade the wings

Marinade the wings

Add rice flour

Add rice flour

Fry at low heat 12 15 min

Fry at low heat 12 15 min

Golden brown fried chicken

Golden brown fried chicken

Fry again at high heat

Fry again at high heat

Crispy dry fried chicken

Crispy dry fried chicken



Reviews

Overall Rating (12)

4 out of 5 stars
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  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    I made this tonight and my wife & I loved it! There are a couple of caveats: the marinade does contain sugar, which can cause some people problems. Simple solution - be meticulous about watching your frying temperatures. Never let the temperature of the oil exceed 300 deg or drop below 250 deg during the first part of the frying process. Never let the oil temp exceed 350 deg during the second part of the frying process. I pulled mine before it was quite as dark as the photos on this page. I did not have rice flour so substituted a 50/50 flour/cornstarch mix. It did not adhere as well as I would have preferred, but the fried bits of coating were delicious. ;-) Next time I will try adding an egg wash before coating with flour. I have photos, but am having problems with the photo uploader.

  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    I made this tonight and it tasted pretty good.

  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Get your own blog Howard

  • Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    @howard if you were clever you would know to adjust to your own liking and to accommodate to your family's taste. be thankful for a shared recipe get your own damn blog howard.

  • Howard

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    I tried your Gai Tod Hatyai and my family was very disappointed. They would not eat this recipe because it appeared burned to them and I was out $14.00 in chicken wings. When you use an excess of sugar in a fried food marinade or coating, all it does is make the coating more chewy and under high temperature, in oil or on the BBQ, the sugar carbonizes and turns black. You need to re-think the addition of sugar in this recipe especially if you are going to raise the temperature at the very last. The sugar, raising the temperature, and the rice flour is not needed. Dusting with 50 flour and cornstarch will give a much better crispy coating at 325F. Also, add some garlic, fish sauce, lime, sambal oelek, and chinese parsley (cilantro) to the sweet chili sauce to kick it up a notch. All of your other recipes are great. They are good bases for fusion with other cuisines. I am especially taken with the Por Kwan Tom Yum Paste. There are so many things that you can do with this product other than make soup. Why don't you pull the sugar out of the Hat Yai chicken and replace it with Tom Yum Paste. Mmmmmm.

  • Howard

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Last night, I made the recipe again.

  • Jim B

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    I made this tonight and my wife & I loved it! There are a couple of caveats: the marinade does contain sugar, which can cause some people problems. Simple solution - be meticulous about watching your frying temperatures. Never let the temperature of the oil exceed 300 deg or drop below 250 deg during the first part of the frying process. Never let the oil temp exceed 350 deg during the second part of the frying process. I pulled mine before it was quite as dark as the photos on this page. I did not have rice flour so substituted a 50/50 flour/cornstarch mix. It did not adhere as well as I would have preferred, but the fried bits of coating were delicious. ;-) Next time I will try adding an egg wash before coating with flour. I have photos, but am having problems with the photo uploader.

  • Bei

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    I made this tonight and it tasted pretty good.

  • Anonymous

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    Get your own blog Howard

  • Fancythis

    Rated 4 out of 5 stars

    @howard if you were clever you would know to adjust to your own liking and to accommodate to your family's taste. be thankful for a shared recipe get your own damn blog howard.


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